Tuesday, December 22, 2009

gDitty Visits the White House




Having held the original gDittty prototype last year after meeting Ellen LaPointe, Vice President, Strategic Partnerships from HopeLab, it's good to see this device  finally getting more attention.  In this SmartPlanet video, they show the earlier gDitty along with Nicole Guthrie, a nutritionist at HopeLab. At last year's Games for Health Conference in Boston, I also caught up with Richard Tate, Director, Communications and Marketing at HopeLab.  Click here to read my interview with Richard @ G4H09.
 
 I was also contacted by a parent of a teenager who participated in two of the trials in California and they gave me their impressions of the device, web-service, and social-networking features. Let's just say that's why you need focus groups to work out the bugs and technical issues.  I've seen some newer images of the gDitty and it appears to be smaller  - but I'd love to have some "leaked" images to post.

Richard Ross, 12, of San Francisco , holds his gDitty device, made by HopeLab as he speaks in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, June 30, 2009, prior to President Barack Obamadelivering remarks highlighting innovative non-profit programs.

The work that HopeLab does is amazing and their constant push to assess their products/programs in order to  inform better practice is what we in education should always strive for. I think that many groups such as HopeLab could benefit from having someone on their team with a background in physical activity, physical education or education in general in addition to their already talented group.  It stems from the fact that many research projects - especially interventions that target physical activity, games, and youth, - lack someone who's background can help in the programming and implementation success.  Physical educators strive to create positive and safe learning environments that are developmentally appropriate for the skill levels and abilities of the students. We use pedagogically sound teaching practices to help students achieve the intended learning objectives and we strive to provide timely, specific, and congruent feedback that helps to motivate and inform the student on their progress.  Call me crazy - but that's what we do.  En tout cas....

For more information, follow them on Twitter @HopeLab - most of the tweets will be coming from Maurina Venturelli, Web Communications and Social Media Consultant.

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